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Board of Commissioner Meetings

The Thursday, November 26th, 2020 scheduled meeting is cancelled due to it being Thanksgiving Day.

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis and Governor Inslee’s prohibition of public gatherings and following his additional proclamation regarding public meetings dated March 24, the regular CCF&R Board meeting scheduled on Thursday, December 10th at 4:00 p.m. will be held as a virtual meeting. Please refer to the following information for details on remote viewer access.

REMOTE ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS

You may join meeting by clicking on the meeting link below or going to join.zoom.us and entering Meeting room ID # 262 342 327, Password # 492020

Join Zoom Meeting – Thursday, December 10th at 4:00 p.m.

https://zoom.us/j/262342327?pwd=SNtRHlXcE15cVFodjF3OERIcFZaZz09

Published in accordance with RCW 84.55.120 & the Open Public Meetings Act RCW 42.30


Regular Board meetings are held the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. Meetings begin at 4:00 p.m. and are held at Station 21 located at 911 N 65th Avenue in Ridgefield, WA. Any variations to this schedule will be posted here.

Public Meeting Notice – Virtual Meeting

Clark County Fire & Rescue

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Posted in General Information


Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue

Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue provides Fire Protection and Advanced Life Support (ALS) service and Basic Life Support service to the community.
Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue
Clark-Cowlitz Fire RescueThursday, December 3rd, 2020 at 2:15pm
Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue (CCFR) has partnered with Southwest Washington Accountable Community of Health (SWACH) for an innovative Community Health Outreach Program:

Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue (formerly Clark County Fire & Rescue) has partnered with SWACH (Southwest Washington Accountable Community of Health) to establish a first of its kind pilot program in Clark County and Woodland, WA. The innovative C.A.R.E.S. (Community Assistance Referral and Education Services Program) aims to advocate for community member needs through connection to services, education, and effective use of resources for improved health in our community. The pilot program follows similar models that have been established elsewhere in the State to better connect vulnerable and at-risk populations with appropriate resources they need for healthy and independent living.

Division Chief Mike Jackson said, “We have seen steady increases in people calling 9-1-1 for situations that may be better handled with other, non-emergency resources in recent years. Many times people in need don’t know what resources exist or how to reach them. These situations lead to people using 9-1-1 and emergency responders when they don’t know who else to call. Our system, like most, is not designed for people to get the wide range of different resources they may need through 9-1-1, which was intended solely for time critical emergencies. When our limited emergency responders are tied up with non-emergencies it can hamper or delay our response to critical situations.”

People that are often most at-risk use 9-1-1 repeatedly as the only connection to help they can find. In addition to helping manage the use of emergency response resources like fire trucks and ambulances, the program aims to divert non-emergency health care needs away from the limited space in hospital emergency rooms that are amongst the most expensive health care services to operate. The current Emergency Medical 9-1-1 system is only designed to take people with emergencies to emergency rooms at hospitals.

Working as an integrated program into SWACH’s HealthConnect network, the C.A.R.E.S. program will help connect people with chronic and non-emergency needs to diverse resources that are better suited to their specific problems.

SWACH’s HealthConnect program was launched in April 2019 with a variety of social, behavioral, and medical partners. HealthConnect operates in Clark, Klickitat, and Skamania counties to better serve community members with chronic conditions and in need of education, services, and ongoing support. To-date, HealthConnect has built a local network with 11 organizations and 40+ Community Health Workers (CHWs), and has helped over 600 participants across our region.

The program establishes a contract with funding and guidance from SWACH to the Fire District for a 2-year pilot that will measure outcomes and program effectiveness. The Fire District (Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue) uses the funds to provide full-time staffing with a seasoned social worker alongside an experienced firefighter paramedic. The team will take referrals from first responders, hospitals, clinics, and other service providers for people identified as at-risk or suffering from issues including: mental health, food stability, chronic medical conditions, and other situations where they don’t currently have appropriate resources or a personal support network in place. The team will make pro-active, scheduled home visits to those that are referred and provide assessments of medical and living conditions. The assessments will be used to provide education, support, and connection to resources in the community that can address their specific needs. The program targets seniors, people with disabilities, and others in need of assistance that may have limited support from their family and social networks. In addition to improving health and driving better use of emergency resources, the program is expected to have a positive impact on current community issues surrounding mental health and opioid addiction by connecting people with a wide range of resources.

Sam Lewis, who serves as the outreach coordinator for the program, holds a Master of Social Work degree and comes to the program with significant background and experience with diverse programs for at-risk populations. Sam said this about the program: “The C.A.R.E.S. Program is able to provide more effective and appropriate care for the citizens we serve through improved engagement with the community of care surrounding them as well as helping to bridge that gap around system silos that have typically existed in healthcare.” Mike Jackson noted that CCFR was fortunate to pair Sam Lewis and his extensive Social Work expertise with that of two seasoned First Responders, Captain-Paramedic Eric Lawrence and Firefighter-Paramedic Josh Haldeman to design the program and get it started. John Nohr, Fire Chief of Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue stated, “We are excited to partner with SWACH for this opportunity to improve the health of our community while using our resources more efficiently to get the right help to the right people at the right time, especially in emergencies. We are confident that the C.A.R.E.S. program will prove valuable for the long-term safety, health, and preparedness of our community.”

The Accountable Community of Health for Southwest Washington (SWACH) is funding the CCFR C.A.R.E.S. program as part of the State’s Healthier Washington Initiative. More information can be found at their website: https://southwestach.org/

*Attached photo shows the CCFR C.A.R.E.S. outreach team (Sam Lewis, MSW and Josh Haldeman, Firefighter/Paramedic) with equipment in front of a District vehicle.

###

About SWACH-
Southwest Washington Accountable Community of Health (SWACH), which includes the Healthy Living Collaborative, is a local nonprofit working to improve health in Southwest Washington. We bring together community members and other experts to address our region’s major health challenges. Through innovative partnerships and local resources, we’re working to create lasting changes and a healthier future – for everyone.
The SWACH region is made up of Clark, Klickitat and Skamania Counties. With our partner ACH, Cascade Pacific Action Alliance, we also support the counties of Cowlitz and Wahkiakum. SWACH is one of nine organizations leading the state’s Healthier Washington Initiative in their regions. These Accountable Communities of Health (ACHs) are building a healthier Washington that meets their communities’ unique needs. Learn more at the Washington Health Authority Website.

About HealthConnect-
The HealthConnect Model is our regional blend of people, process, technology, and programs, designed to provide a coordinated response for residents with complex health and social needs. Accessible from wherever a participant first seeks services, the model provides connections, support, and infrastructure to formerly isolated silos.
HealthConnect clears the path to services people need. By connecting with a dedicated community-based care coordinator, people can meet critical needs with fewer barriers. With a central, shared community health record, the HealthConnect Hub of partners, and a trained navigator to lead the way, HealthConnect makes it happen.
Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue
Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue is feeling excited in Ridgefield, Washington.Thursday, December 3rd, 2020 at 1:58pm
Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue (CCFR) has partnered with Southwest Washington Accountable Community of Health (SWACH) for an innovative Community Health Outreach Program:

Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue (formerly Clark County Fire & Rescue) has partnered with SWACH (Southwest Washington Accountable Community of Health) to establish a first of its kind pilot program in Clark County and Woodland, WA. The innovative C.A.R.E.S. (Community Assistance Referral and Education Services Program) aims to advocate for community member needs through connection to services, education, and effective use of resources for improved health in our community. The pilot program follows similar models that have been established elsewhere in the State to better connect vulnerable and at-risk populations with appropriate resources they need for healthy and independent living.

Division Chief Mike Jackson said, “We have seen steady increases in people calling 9-1-1 for situations that may be better handled with other, non-emergency resources in recent years. Many times people in need don’t know what resources exist or how to reach them. These situations lead to people using 9-1-1 and emergency responders when they don’t know who else to call. Our system, like most, is not designed for people to get the wide range of different resources they may need through 9-1-1, which was intended solely for time critical emergencies. When our limited emergency responders are tied up with non-emergencies it can hamper or delay our response to critical situations.”

People that are often most at-risk use 9-1-1 repeatedly as the only connection to help they can find. In addition to helping manage the use of emergency response resources like fire trucks and ambulances, the program aims to divert non-emergency health care needs away from the limited space in hospital emergency rooms that are amongst the most expensive health care services to operate. The current Emergency Medical 9-1-1 system is only designed to take people with emergencies to emergency rooms at hospitals.

Working as an integrated program into SWACH’s HealthConnect network, the C.A.R.E.S. program will help connect people with chronic and non-emergency needs to diverse resources that are better suited to their specific problems.

SWACH’s HealthConnect program was launched in April 2019 with a variety of social, behavioral, and medical partners. HealthConnect operates in Clark, Klickitat, and Skamania counties to better serve community members with chronic conditions and in need of education, services, and ongoing support. To-date, HealthConnect has built a local network with 11 organizations and 40+ Community Health Workers (CHWs), and has helped over 600 participants across our region.

The program establishes a contract with funding and guidance from SWACH to the Fire District for a 2-year pilot that will measure outcomes and program effectiveness. The Fire District (Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue) uses the funds to provide full-time staffing with a seasoned social worker alongside an experienced firefighter paramedic. The team will take referrals from first responders, hospitals, clinics, and other service providers for people identified as at-risk or suffering from issues including: mental health, food stability, chronic medical conditions, and other situations where they don’t currently have appropriate resources or a personal support network in place. The team will make pro-active, scheduled home visits to those that are referred and provide assessments of medical and living conditions. The assessments will be used to provide education, support, and connection to resources in the community that can address their specific needs. The program targets seniors, people with disabilities, and others in need of assistance that may have limited support from their family and social networks. In addition to improving health and driving better use of emergency resources, the program is expected to have a positive impact on current community issues surrounding mental health and opioid addiction by connecting people with a wide range of resources.

Sam Lewis, who serves as the outreach coordinator for the program, holds a Master of Social Work degree and comes to the program with significant background and experience with diverse programs for at-risk populations. Sam said this about the program: “The C.A.R.E.S. Program is able to provide more effective and appropriate care for the citizens we serve through improved engagement with the community of care surrounding them as well as helping to bridge that gap around system silos that have typically existed in healthcare.” Mike Jackson noted that CCFR was fortunate to pair Sam Lewis and his extensive Social Work expertise with that of two seasoned First Responders, Captain-Paramedic Eric Lawrence and Firefighter-Paramedic Josh Haldeman to design the program and get it started. John Nohr, Fire Chief of Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue stated, “We are excited to partner with SWACH for this opportunity to improve the health of our community while using our resources more efficiently to get the right help to the right people at the right time, especially in emergencies. We are confident that the C.A.R.E.S. program will prove valuable for the long-term safety, health, and preparedness of our community.”

The Accountable Community of Health for Southwest Washington (SWACH) is funding the CCFR C.A.R.E.S. program as part of the State’s Healthier Washington Initiative. More information can be found at their website: https://southwestach.org/

*Attached photo shows the CCFR C.A.R.E.S. outreach team (Sam Lewis, MSW and Josh Haldeman, Firefighter/Paramedic) with equipment in front of a District vehicle.

###

About SWACH
Southwest Washington Accountable Community of Health (SWACH), which includes the Healthy Living Collaborative, is a local nonprofit working to improve health in Southwest Washington. We bring together community members and other experts to address our region’s major health challenges. Through innovative partnerships and local resources, we’re working to create lasting changes and a healthier future – for everyone.
The SWACH region is made up of Clark, Klickitat and Skamania Counties. With our partner ACH, Cascade Pacific Action Alliance, we also support the counties of Cowlitz and Wahkiakum. SWACH is one of nine organizations leading the state’s Healthier Washington Initiative in their regions. These Accountable Communities of Health (ACHs) are building a healthier Washington that meets their communities’ unique needs. Learn more at the Washington Health Authority Website.

About HealthConnect
The HealthConnect Model is our regional blend of people, process, technology, and programs, designed to provide a coordinated response for residents with complex health and social needs. Accessible from wherever a participant first seeks services, the model provides connections, support, and infrastructure to formerly isolated silos.
HealthConnect clears the path to services people need. By connecting with a dedicated community-based care coordinator, people can meet critical needs with fewer barriers. With a central, shared community health record, the HealthConnect Hub of partners, and a trained navigator to lead the way, HealthConnect makes it happen.